A big Hello from Scotland in UK

Introduce yourself to us and other members here, or share your own product reviews, suggestions, and tips and tricks of using Eryone products.
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wireless
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2020 9:32 pm

A big Hello from Scotland in UK

Post by wireless » Thu Jun 11, 2020 10:11 pm

Hello - I am Bob, and I come from Dunfermline in Scotland. About 1,000 years ago, this town used to be the Capital of Scotland with many Kings and Queens ruling from here.

I'm a newbie to 3D printing, but have been an engineer for 45 years. Now retired and thoroughly enjoying manyhobbies.

I have an Artillery GENIUS printer and the ERYONE filaments are the best I have tried so far.

I just registered today and posted my first post in the filaments section with the aim of giving some feedback on my experiences and prints so far. You can see the post at https://www.eryone.com/forum/viewtopic. ... &t=85#p568

I am planning to try some TPU filament next, so would appreciate any experiences you have to share on using this material.

Apart from my printer and my filament choice, the other two elements in my setup are
  • CAD Software: FUSION 360
  • SLICER Software: CURA
Fusion 360 is awesome and I have started to get more experienced with it. The picture I'm sharing here is a replacement part for one of the solar lights in the garden. This is one of the delights of 3D printing for me - to be able to design and make your own components typically within a day.

CURA was the first Slicer I tried. I found some profiles for the Printer and typical materials from the 3D Nexus website and these have just worked perfectly for me. (I've found that the experimental 'TREE' support has been really helpful for tricky parts.

Best of luck to everyone here!
Solar peg.jpg
Solar peg.jpg (274.89 KiB) Viewed 797 times
IMG_20200606_085252.jpg
IMG_20200606_085252.jpg (221.85 KiB) Viewed 797 times
IMG_20200521_110504.jpg
IMG_20200521_110504.jpg (125 KiB) Viewed 797 times

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kaktus
Site Admin
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2019 3:58 pm

Re: A big Hello from Scotland in UK

Post by kaktus » Sat Jun 13, 2020 8:03 pm

Hi wireless.

I'm looking at your prints, and I see that you should pay attention to the printing direction.
This affects the strength of the models, and the load-bearing capacity. ;)

wireless
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2020 9:32 pm

Re: A big Hello from Scotland in UK

Post by wireless » Mon Jun 15, 2020 12:18 am

Hya kaktus,
That was a bit of a teaser response there since there was no detail given. Can you be a little more specific please - treat me as if I were new to the hobby - because I am! I would much appreciate any help or tips you have to offer.

Thanks in advance.

Lepes
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat May 23, 2020 4:24 am

Re: A big Hello from Scotland in UK

Post by Lepes » Wed Jun 17, 2020 12:38 am

You should rotate the piece 90 degrees along X-Axis, Yes, this piece will not lay flat on the bed, you would need support material to print that piece. At this way the piece will be stronger.

Keep in mind that layer adhesion is exactly the point where a piece could break. Don't trust me, Print a cube let say 10x10x40 mm with 30% infill. If you try to break it, it will.

Now rotate the cube on your Slicer, on X-Axis 90ºC, your cube will be 10x40x10. Once printed, place it verticaly and try to break it. You will not be able to do that, because you are not applying force between layers, you are trying to break the continous filament, that is stronger than layer adhesion.

Mara93
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2020 5:52 am

Re: A big Hello from Scotland in UK

Post by Mara93 » Fri Jul 10, 2020 9:09 pm

Un saludo desde Vigo - España. 🌍🌍😀😀😀🌍🌍

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kaktus
Site Admin
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2019 3:58 pm

Re: A big Hello from Scotland in UK

Post by kaktus » Mon Jul 20, 2020 11:27 pm

Lepes wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 12:38 am
You should rotate the piece 90 degrees along X-Axis, Yes, this piece will not lay flat on the bed, you would need support material to print that piece. At this way the piece will be stronger.

Keep in mind that layer adhesion is exactly the point where a piece could break. Don't trust me, Print a cube let say 10x10x40 mm with 30% infill. If you try to break it, it will.

Now rotate the cube on your Slicer, on X-Axis 90ºC, your cube will be 10x40x10. Once printed, place it verticaly and try to break it. You will not be able to do that, because you are not applying force between layers, you are trying to break the continous filament, that is stronger than layer adhesion.
Hi
You explained beautifully what I meant.
:mrgreen:

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